Melbourne, Australia


Bourke St Melbourne
c.1910, maybe 1900s

Google Street View.


Collins St Melbourne Looking East
c.1910, maybe 1900s

Google Street View.


Grand Hotel Spring St Melbourne
c.1910, maybe 1900s

Google Street View.

The Hotel Windsor is a luxury hotel in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Opened in 1884, the Windsor is notable for being Melbourne’s only surviving purpose-built “grand” Victorian era hotel. . . . The original hotel was built by shipping magnate George Nipper and designed by Charles Webb in a broadly Renaissance Revival style and was completed in 1884, and named “The Grand”. However, Nipper soon sold the building, in 1886, to the a company headed by James Munro and James Balfour. Munro was a politician and the leader of the temperance movement in Victoria, who famously burnt the hotel’s liquor licence in public and operated the hotel as a coffee palace, now renamed the “Grand Coffee Palace”. The building was soon more than doubled in size in 1888, by adding the central section and the north wing, matching the original building, the now internal north wing, and extending the rear wing, all designed again by Charles Webb. Notable features of the expanded hotel included the ballroom, the impressive main staircase, the distinctive twin mansard roofed towers in the Second Empire style, and the stone sculpture, attributed to John Simpson Mackennal, over the main entrance with male female figures known as ‘Peace and Plenty’ reclining over the English and Australian Coat of Arms.
Wikipedia.

On 3 June 1923, with renovations complete, the hotel hosted a luncheon attended by His Royal Highness, The Prince of Wales. In honour of this occasion, the hotel was appropriately renamed The Windsor.
The Hotel Windsor