Vesuvius, Italy


Napoli. | Il Vesuvio-Cratere in eruzione
(Crater of Vesuvius erupting)
1900s
Publisher: Ettore Ragozino, Galleria Umberto-Napoli

Probably a modified/fabricated image, published just before the 1906 eruption.

Mount Vesuvius is a somma-stratovolcano located on the Gulf of Naples in Campania, Italy, about 9 km (5.6 mi) east of Naples and a short distance from the shore. It is one of several volcanoes which form the Campanian volcanic arc. Vesuvius consists of a large cone partially encircled by the steep rim of a summit caldera caused by the collapse of an earlier and originally much higher structure.

The eruption of 5 April 1906 killed more than 100 people and ejected the most lava ever recorded from a Vesuvian eruption. Italian authorities were preparing to hold the 1908 Summer Olympics when Mount Vesuvius violently erupted, devastating the city of Naples and surrounding comunes. Funds were diverted to reconstructing Naples, and a new site for the Olympics had to be found./em>
Wikipedia.


Napoli. | Il Vesuvio-Carozza della Funicolare
(The Funicular car Vesuvia)
c.1904
Publisher: Ettore Ragozino, Galleria Umberto-Napoli

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Dinan, France


Côte d’Emeraude | DINAN — Vue sur la Rance – Le Viaduc
(VIew of the Rance – The Viaduct)
Dated 1912

Google Street View.

Dinan is a walled Breton town and a commune in the Côtes-d’Armor department in northwestern France. . . . Its geographical setting is exceptional. Instead of nestling on the valley floor like Morlaix, most urban development has been on the hillside, overlooking the river Rance. The area alongside the River Rance is known as the port of Dinan and is connected to the town by the steep streets Rue Jerzual and its continuation outside the walls the Rue de Petit Fort.
Wikipedia.

For centuries Le Vieux Pont was the only bridge in Lanvallay. This magnificent stone bridge is in perfect state of maintenance and boasts superb views of the Rance and its banks. However, only pedestrians and light weight vehicles can use it. Indeed, by the early 19th century Le Vieux Pont was already too narrow and too weak to sustain constant and increasing traffic. A new bridge was needed. The first stone (grey granite) of the Viaduc de Lanvallay was therefore laid on September 3, 1846. It opened to traffic in 1852. Ten arches support the 250m long x 40m high viaduct which connects Lanvallay, on the hillside, to the wall city of Dinan on the opposite side.
Travel France Online

Matobo National Park, Zimbabwe


Worlds View in the Matopos
1905-1910
Publisher: R. O. Füsslein, Johannesburg (1905-1910)

Google Street View (approximate).

Malindidzimu (“Hill of the Ancestral Spirits” in Ndebele) is a granite inselberg and a national historical monument situated in the Matobo National Park in south-west Zimbabwe, 25 miles (40 kilometers) south of Bulawayo. It is considered a sacred place by nationalists and indigenous groups. Controversially, Cecil Rhodes is buried on the summit of Malindidizumu, together with Charles Coghlan, Leander Starr Jameson, Allan Wilson and several other white settlers. he English name of the site is “World’s view” which is not to be confused with World’s View, Nyanga.
Wikipedia.

McDonald wrote: “We sat for some time afterwards in the shade of the vast round boulders that seemed to have been thrown up from the bowels of the earth and Rhodes was very silent for a time.” Then he said to himself really: “The peacefulness of it all, the chaotic grandeur of it, it creates a feeling of awe and brings home to one how very small we all are.” Then back he came to the present: “Grey, I call this one of the world’s views.” We all agreed to that, hence its name today: “The World’s View.”
ZimFieldGuide.com

Bedouin Camp


Campement de bédouines au désert
Dated 1923
Publishers: Lehnert & Landrock, Cairo

Livestock and herding, principally of goats, sheep and dromedary camels comprised the traditional livelihoods of Bedouins. These were used for meat, dairy products, and wool. Most of the staple foods that made up the Bedouins’ diet were dairy products. Camels, in particular, had numerous cultural and functional uses. Having been regarded as a “gift from God”, they were the main food source and method of transportation for many Bedouins.[16] In addition to their extraordinary milking potentials under harsh desert conditions, their meat was occasionally consumed by Bedouins. As a cultural tradition, camel races were organized during celebratory occasions, such as weddings or religious festivals.

Some Bedouin societies live in arid regions. In areas where rainfall is very unpredictable, a camp will be moved irregularly, depending on the availability of green pasture. Where winter rainfall is more predictable in regions further south, some Bedouin people plant grain along their migration routes. This proves a resource for the livestock throughout the winter. In regions such as western Africa, where there is more predictable rainfall, the Bedouin practice transhumance. They plant crops near permanent homes in the valleys where there is more rain and move their livestock to the highland pastures.
Wikipedia.

Fluelen, Switzerland


Flüelen mit Bristenstock (3074 m)
(Flüelen with Bristenstock (3074 m) [in the background])
c.1920
Publisher: Photoglob Co, Zurich

Google Street View (location).

Flüelen formed an important transshipment point on Switzerland’s transport system for many centuries, and at least since the opening of the first track across the Gotthard Pass in 1230. The various routes across the pass reached Lake Lucerne at Flüelen, and until the latter half of the 19th century the lake provided the best onward link to the cities of northern Switzerland.
Wikipedia.