Friedrichstraße station, Berlin


Friedrichs-Bahnof. Zum Franziskener
c.1900
Publisher: F. Schüler. Berlin

Google Street View.

Berlin Friedrichstraße is a railway station in the German capital Berlin. It is located on the Friedrichstraße, a major north-south street in the Mitte district of Berlin, adjacent to the point where the street crosses the river Spree. . . In 1878, the first station was built after plans by Johannes Vollmer between the Friedrichstraße and the river Spree as part of the Berlin Stadtbahn construction. The architect was working on the neighbouring Hackescher Markt station at the same time. Just as the elevated viaduct the station is integrated into, the station rests on large arches built with masonry. The station had two platforms with two tracks each, covered by a large, curved train shed which rested on steel trusses of different length to cover the curvature of the viaduct underneath. The main entrance was on the northern side, the pick-up for horse carriages on the south side. Station opening was on 7 February 1882, as part of the ceremonial opening of the Berlin Stadtbahn. Long distance trains started on 15 May the same year.
Wikipedia.

“Berlin Friedrichstraße station: the prospective train shed; view east towards Friedrichstraße. The engraving is a copy, enlivened with staffage figures, of the original architectural drawing published 1885” (from Wikimedia Commons).
Floor plan, 1885 Technische Universität Berlin, Architekturmuseum

So when the East Germans built the wall that sealed off West Berlin, they made sure to add metal and glass barriers to divide the platforms of Friedrichstrasse as well. The station became an international oddity, in that it was located entirely in East Berlin, but some of its train platforms and all of its underground services were only for West Berliners. Passengers would often have to make a border crossing when moving from one story of the building to the other. For the next 28 years, it was, effectively, a three-dimensional border, one drawn not between north and south or east and west, but between up and down.
Conde Nast Traveller

(Via Google Translate)
In 1882, the architects Kayser & Groszheim set up the restaurant complex “Zum Franziskaner” in the Stadtbahn arches no. 198-206 east of Friedrichstraße station at Georgenstraße 12 a/13. “This magnificent facility is at the same time the first artistically executed example of the gigantic pubs that have been appearing since the mid-1970s, known as ‘beer churches’ in Berlin folk jokes, in which mostly local beer was served. […] Drawn in the wildest forms of the German Renaissance The exterior architecture of the ‘Franziskaner’ refrains from any attempt to fit harmoniously into the massive and clumsy masonry of the Stadtbahn arches,
The “Zum Franziskaner” beer palace existed here until 1913, after which other establishments have operated at the site to this day
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Sammlung Online

“Berlin Friedrichstraße station, east-façade”, 1898 (from Wikimedia Commons).

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