Old Palace, Berlin


Berlin. Palais Kaiser Wilhelm I.
c.1900

The Old Palace (German: Altes Palais), also called Kaiser Wilhelm Palace (Kaiser-Wilhelm-Palais), is a former Royal Prussian residence on Unter den Linden boulevard in Mitte, the historic heart and city center of Berlin. It was built between 1834 to 1837 by order of Prince William of Prussia, who later became German Emperor William I, according to plans by Carl Ferdinand Langhans in Neoclassical style. Damaged during the Allied bombing in World War II, the Old Palace was rebuilt from 1963 to 1964 as part of the Forum Fridericianum. . . . The Prussian crown prince Frederick William hired one of the most prominent architects of Germany, Karl Friedrich Schinkel, to design a memorial complex for Frederick the Great. However, after being disappointed with the expensive plans of Schinkel, he accepted the modest concept of the architect Carl Ferdinand Langhans in Neoclassical-style. As the construction of the palace was completed in 1837, the then crown prince William I began using the building as his residence until his death in 1888. The palace was built with a pergola, a mezzanine and a vestibule.
Wikipedia.

(Via Google Translate)
Langhans erected the building in the years 1834 to 1837 in the classical style. It has 13 window axes facing the street with a covered portico -like driveway surrounded by an eagle frieze. Eagles fly at the corners. A green pergola was added to the Opernplatz. Wilhelm’s living and working rooms were on the lower floor of the left part of the building, facing the street and a green inner courtyard at the back, while Augusta’s were on the upper floor, connected by an intimate spiral staircase. The vestibule was located in the central part, the representative staircase and the social rooms above. In the right part, which extended as a much longer side wing from Oranische Gasse to Behrenstraße, there were festival rooms, including the large circular dance hall. Towards Behrenstraße, around a second inner courtyard, were the service and living quarters of the staff, horse stables and a coach house . In everyday operation, the entrance on the narrow Oranische Gasse served as the main entrance and right of way. . . . During the imperial period , the palace developed into one of the most important sights in Berlin. Wilhelm always appeared at the “historic corner window” of his study on the ground floor to watch the guard procession Unter den Linden at the Neue Wache diagonally opposite.
Wikipedia.

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