Source des Célestins, Vichy, France


VICHY — Source des Célestins.
c.1910
Publisher: Levy Sons & Co

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Translated from French by Google Translate
The Celestins spring pavilion houses the eponymous spring in Vichy , a spa resort in the south-east of the Allier department . Vast oval-shaped hall, opening onto the park by seven arches, it was built in the 1900s in a neoclassical style by the architect Lucien Woog. The name of the Celestins comes from of the former Celestine convent which was located just above the source.
Wikipedia.

Vichy-Celestins is associated with Vichy, a prestigious spa town located on the banks of the river Allier, in Bourbonnais, a former duchy that today corresponds to the department of Allier in Auvergne. Les Celestins is one of the 14 sources (hot and cold water) that spring in this region located on the foothills of the dormant volcanoes of Auvergne. The source Vichy-Celestins is nestled in the park of the former Couvent des Celestins. . . . Archaeological excavations show that Vichy was already a renowned spa during the Gallo-Roma era, some 2000 years ago. The name ‘Vichy’ evolved from vicus calidus, a name that translates roughly as the town with hot springs. Vichy became a trendy spa in the 18th century after the visit of King Louis XIV. This notoriety was consecrated in the mid 19th century when Napoleon III took the habit of sojourning in Vichy to treat his rheumatism, gout and dermatitis! An elegant Neoclassical building was then built in the Parc des Celestins to showcase the source Vichy-Celestins. This building, located below the site of the former convent, was classified as a historical monument in 1986. The source Vichy-Celestins springs at a constant temperature of 17.3°C and is labelled as a ‘cold water source”. Vichy-Celestins is naturally carbonated; it draws mineral salts and trace elements from the volcanic soil, and is renown for its proven digestive properties.
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