Casino de Monte Carlo, Monaco


Monte-Carlo. — Le Casino. — LL.
Published: Levy & Sons, c.1910

Street View

The idea of opening a gambling casino in Monaco belongs to Princess Caroline, a shrewd, business-minded spouse of Prince Florestan I. Revenues from the proposed venture were supposed to save the House of Grimaldi from bankruptcy. The ruling family’s persistent financial problems became especially acute after the loss of tax revenue from two breakaway towns, Menton and Roquebrune, which declared independence from Monaco in 1848 and refused to pay taxes on olive oil and fruit imposed by the Grimaldis.

In 1854, Charles, Florestan’s son and future Prince of Monaco, recruited a team of Frenchmen—writer Albert Aubert and businessman Napoleon Langlois—to devise a development plan and write a prospectus to attract 4 million francs needed to build a spa for the treatment of various diseases, a gambling casino modeled from the Bad Homburg casino, and English-styled villas. Granted the concession of 30 years to operate a bathing establishment and gaming tables, Aubert and Langlois opened the first casino at 14 December 1856 in Villa Bellevu. Intended to be only a temporary location, the building was a modest mansion in La Condamine.

In the late 1850s, Monaco was an unlikely place for a resort to succeed. The lack of roads needed to connect Monaco to Nice and the rest of Europe, and the absence of comfortable accommodations for visitors, as well as the concessionaires’ failure to publicize the new resort, resulted in far fewer customers than was originally anticipated. Unable to raise the capital needed to operate the money-losing enterprise, Aubert and Langlois ceded their rights to Frossard de Lilbonne, who in turn passed it to Pierre Auguste Daval in 1857.
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Wikipedia

Website.
Virtual tour (once inside, the grid in the top left is the easiest way to get around).


Casino de Monte Carlo.– Autour de la Roulette. –LL
Roulette Table c.1915
Salle Europe.


Casino de Monte Carlo, Salle Touzet (Trente et Quarante)
c.1920

Salle Touzet Nord

Trente et Quarante (Thirty & Forty) is a French card game Wikipedia article.


Monte-Carlo. — Façade nord du Casino.

Published Neurdien & Co, Paris. (1916-1918 or pre-1919)

Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork, Ireland


St. Fin Barre’s Cathedral, Cork.

Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral (Irish: Ardeaglais Naomh Fionnbarra) is a Gothic Revival three-spire cathedral in the city of Cork, Ireland. It belongs to the Church of Ireland and was completed in 1879. The cathedral is located on the south side of the River Lee, on ground that has been a place of worship since the 7th century, and is dedicated to Finbarr of Cork, patron saint of the city.
Wikipedia.

William Burges was appointed architect for a new cathedral in 1862, after a competition for which there were 63 entries. Among the requirements of the competition was that the cost of the building should not exceed £15,000 and Burges was criticised by other architects because the cost of the towers, spires and carving was not included in his estimate. In the end some £100,000 was spent on the building. In 1865 the foundation stone was laid by Bishop John Gregg and on St. Andrew’s Day,1870, the building was consecrated. The towers and spires were not completed until 1879.
Saint Fin Barre’s Cathedral

Mosque of Mohamed Ali, Cairo


The Alabaster Mosk Mohamed Aly
Published: Lichtenstern & Harari 1902-1912

Street View

Virtual Tour

Wikipedia.

The mosque of Muhammad Ali Pasha is one of the most renowned historical and touristic landmarks in Egypt. The design for this mosque was derived from the Mosque of Sultan Ahmad in Istanbul (built AH 1025/AD 1616). Construction of the mosque began in AH 1246/AD 1830 and work continued on it, without interruption, until the death of Muhammad Ali Pasha in AH 1265/AD 1848. He was buried in a tomb that he had prepared for himself within the mosque in the southwestern corner. Construction of the walls, domes and minaret had been completed by the time of Ali Pasha’s death, and when ‘Abbas Pasha I assumed power (r. AH 1265–70/AD 1848–54), he ordered the completion of work on the marble, carvings and the gilding, and added a marble construction and a copper maqsura for Ali Pasha’s mausoleum.
Museum With No Frontiers: Discover Islamic Art

The mosque of Muhammad ‘Ali Pasha was built between 1828 and 1848. Perched on the summit of the citadel, this Ottoman mosque, the largest to be built in the first half of the 19th c., is, with its animated silhouette and twin minarets, the most visible mosque in Cairo. It is built on the site of Mamluk palaces destroyed at the behest of the patron, an act reminiscent of that of Saladin who wiped out all traces of Fatimid power by dismantling their palaces, and it also superseded the adjacent Mosque of al-Nasir Muhammad as the new state mosque. This first independent ruler of Egypt chose to build his state mosque entirely in the architectural style of his former overlords, the Ottomans, unlike the Mamluks who, despite their political submission to the Ottomans, tenaciously stuck to the architectural styles of the two Mamluk dynasties.
ArchNet


On back:
No. 418 Cairo: Interior of the Mosque of Mohammed Ali, built in 1830-1848. It is richly decorated and its walls are encrusted with alabaster from the quarries of Beni Suef.
Published: Eastern Publishing Company, Cairo


CAIRO – Mohamed Ali Mosque
c.1910
Published Lehnert & Landrock, Cairo

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